Animals with tax returns, are they earning more than you?

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We don’t like to limit ourselves here at POP, so when we research available tax deductions, why stop at humans? After all, many of the creatures that wander the earth have been around for much longer than us, and so surely they have a more in-depth understanding of tax rules and legislation. It’s just common sense. Although one can only wonder, ‘What do they claim?’

Whales

Whales, for those unaware, live in the sea. And as one would expect, they spend a considerable amount of time travelling around the ocean. As a result whales used to be able to claim both the Living Away from Home Allowance (LAFHA) plus deductions for food and accommodation. However, in recent years, a landmark court case deemed that because the ocean was their natural home, they were no longer eligible for said deductions. So now, all whales just work from home and claim a percentage of the ocean as their home office.

Monkeys

What, you think monkey’s started using tools for no reason? Many advanced mammals can claim for tools and equipment, especially more advanced primates such as orangutans, chimpanzees and bricklayers.

Hermit Crabs

Hermit crabs used to be able to claim for every shell they moved into, on the basis that they were required to wear it as a uniform for work. However, a recent ruling has now deemed a hermit crab’s shell as its home and not a taxable item of clothing.

Rabbits

You might think they are just cute little creatures that love to look adorable (and spread diseases) but rabbits have also created a cultural identity that is perfectly aligned to the ATO system. You see, rabbits breed like… I don’t know, something that breeds a lot. Anyway, they end up with heaps of dependents under the age of 18 (especially because rabbits only live for 5 to 10 years) and as an added bonus, they spend very little time caring for them.  It’s a win-win.

Flying Bugs

Ever wonder, with the world so big, how flies, mosquitoes, beetles and other insects manage to get squished on your windscreen? In a loophole that will likely be closed at some stage over the next few years, bugs have been able to claim travel expenses and even vehicle costs as long as the travel is deemed work related. However, this means that they are essentially doubling down on your claim – it’s your vehicle, and you are the one paying for the trip. As soon as lawyers close this loophole, windscreens will be a lot less dirty, and the mortality rate for bugs on the open road should significantly drop.

Lions

Lions, as monarchs within the constitutional monarchy of the jungle, are exempt from paying tax. However, the pride of lion still elects who their King will be, and election expenses are claimable regardless of whether the candidate wins or loses.

Turtles

Turtles live a really long time, and so they tend to make additional contributions to their superannuation. “It’s not a choice,” said Ted Turtle. “When you live to be well over 100 years old, you need to make sure you have planned for your future.” Fortunately, superannuation contributions are claimable if you are self-employed, which all turtles are.

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